Walk No. 6

WALK No. 6 – BLAKEY HEY – STANLEY GRANGE – FIRWOOD AND GOOSEFOOT LANES.

**********SOME PAGES OF BOOK MISSING********

**********SOME PAGES OF BOOK MISSING********

**********SOME PAGES OF BOOK MISSING********

Bowland fells are visible from the rising ground by the quarry.

THE STILE ONTO ROACH ROAD IS BETWEEN THE POND AND GATE. HERE, TURN RIGHT ONTO ROACH ROAD AND FOLLOW THE PERIMETER WALL AROUND STANLEY GRANGE.

If you would like to lengthen the route, turn left at this point into Roach Road then, almost immediately, right down to Cripplegate Lane.

Pass Cripplegate Farm and as you proceed to Quaker Brook Farm, you will pass the sites of several cottages, which have long since disappeared. Turn right into Quaker Brook Lane and go back to Stanley Grange.

On Quaker Brook Lane there are two left-hand footpaths; one going to Roach Road via Higher Barn Farm and the other to Preston Old Road and Cuerdale Hey.

Beeston Villas replace an earlier dwelling called Popes, and there used to be a small farm called Tallentine, at the junction o? Quaker Brook Lane and Roach Road. This was demolished in order to erect a gatehouse for Stanley Grange, but the plan was never completed.

Stanley Grange was the home of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Miller Crook, whose generosity enabled Samlesbury Church, not only to be re-roofed but also to have a tower, clock, bells and porches added.

Since then the Grange has been a training base for the Lancashire Constabulary Police Cadets and is now a home and workshop for the mentally sub-normal.

A number of properties in the vicinity bear the name Stanley, as a result of historical connections with the Earls of Derby.

Just beyond Quaker Brook Lane, there is a small cottage on the left called Mawdsley Fold. This is an old building and, when the thatch was removed, workmen came across a partially burnt leather bag, full of old coins. It was claimed as Treasure Trove, but Mr. Miller Crook was allowed to keep some as souvenirs.

AT THE END OF THE BRICK WALL, TURN RIGHT, PASSING BETWEEN STANLEY VILLAS AND THE GROUNDS OI‘ THE GRANGE. THE FIRST STILE IS IMMEDIATELY APPARENT AND LEADS DIRECTLY ACROSS THE FIELD TO THE NEXT ONE BY A GATE.

(At the turn of the century, there was an outdoor theatre on the right, behind the grange wall).

ONCE OVER THE SECOND STILE, GO TOWARDS A BRICK-BUILT INSPECTION CHAMBER. PASSING TO THE RlGHT OF IT, MAKE FOR A THIRD STILE STRAIGHT AHEAD.

The level land on the left was used to host gymkhana events when motor vehicles were first becoming popular. Behind is a barn which was built to house the prize Shorthorn bulls which were bred at Stanley Grange, shod by the Hoghton blacksmith and exereiszed on local lanes.

KEEPING TO AN INTERMITENT HEDGE ON THE RIGHT, MAKE FOR THE FOOTBRIDGE AT THE BOTTOM OF THE SLOPE, THEN CROSS A STILE AND DITCH AT THE TOP OF THE NEXT RISE. FOLLOW THE RIGHT-HAND HEDGE AND ENTER FIRWOOD LANE ALONGSIDE A BUNGALOW.

The field on the opposite side of the right-hand hedge has been identified in the past as that recorded in 1292 as Longleigh, or Longfield. A tithebarn, (or grange) is supposed to have stood in aproximately the same position as the bungalow, at what was probably a crossroads. It would have served the area south of the l)mwvn and been conveniently close to the glebe farms of Fleetwood Hall and Firwood. Both meadows adjacent to the bungalow were still being recorded in the valuation records of 1834 as Tithe Barn Fields.

TURN RIGHT ONTO THE TARMAC ROAD, THEN LEFT AT THE JUNCTION WITH GOOSEFOOT LANE. ANOTHER TWO THIRDS OF A MILE OR SO, WILL BRING YOU BACK TO THE STARTING POINT.